Thompson Brothers Digital Photograph Collection

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Albert G. (Dutch) Roth Marking the A.T.
Document ID: 0012_001011_000200_0001
Sunrise from Myrtle Point
Document ID: 0012_001011_000209_0001
Laurel Falls
Document ID: 0012_001011_000299_0001, One of the prettiest displays of water in the Great Smokies is at Laurel Falls. Here the word Falls is used in the plural advisedly, for there are really two separate falls -- one immediately above and the other immediately below the trail. The trail crosses the beautiful stream on a fifteen-foot shelf that separates the two falls. In this view we see the upper.
Appalachian Trail
Document ID: 0012_001011_000300_0001, Perhaps the most dramatic or spectacular spot in the Great Smokies is Charlies Bunion. It is on the Main crest of the Smokies, four miles northeast of Newfound Gap, and is reached only by the Appalachian Trail. This jagged point is no more rugged than other near-by peaks along the Sawtooth section of the Great Smokies. Its extreme ruggedness, however, was exposed to view when that spot was swept by fire in 1925. Dense forests give an apparent smoothness to equally precipitious points near this picturesquely named feature. Mt. Le Conte is seen in the right background.
Charlies Bunion (East)
Document ID: 0012_001011_000301_0001, Perhaps the most dramatic or spectacular spot in the Great Smokies is Charlies Bunion. It is on the Main crest of the Smokies, four miles northeast of Newfound Gap, and is reached only by the Applachian Trail. This jagged point is no more rugged that other near-by peaks along the Sawtooth section of the Great Smokies. Its extreme ruggedness, however, was exposed to view when that spot was swept by fire in 1925. Dense forests give an apparent smoothness to equally precipitious points near this pinturesquely named feature. Mt. Le Conte is seen in the right background.
Le Conte, December 1925
Document ID: 0012_001011_000303_0001
The Jump-off Mt. Kephartd
Document ID: 0012_001011_000304_0001, Greenbrier Pinnacle at the right
Mountain Stream
Document ID: 0012_001011_000305_0001, Most of the streams in the Great Smokies are entirely safe for drinking purposes. The water flows from deep-shaded mountain sides, free from human contamination, and it is well aerated as it dashes wildly down the steep mountain sides. Even during the hottest days of summer, the water is so cold that it will cause one's hands to ache if held in the water for a few minutes.
Rhododendrons
Document ID: 0012_001011_000306_0001, A writer who saw this picture recently referred to the Rhododendrons seen in it as "a barrier of beauty". Another, who had more experience in hiking or crawling through such tangled growths, added that it would be a barrier to anyone, regardless of personal pulchritude. To follow bear paths is almost the only way that hikers can penetrate Rhododendron thickets. This is the same growth that is, when seen from a distance, often called "Laurel slicks".
Rich Mt. Road into Cades Cove
Document ID: 0012_001011_000307_0001, From the Knoxville-Cade's Cove highway we see this outstanding beauty spot of the Great Smokies. This is the only highway over Rich and Cove Mountains leading into picturesque Cade's Cove, shown in the center of the picture. The Cove, which is about six miles long and two miles wide, is completely surrounded by mountains. The high range in the backgorund forms the Tennessee-North Carolina state line. Thunderhead, the peak at the left, has an elevation of 5530 feet, while the cove is only 1807 feet above sea level.
Typical Mountain Cabin
Document ID: 0012_001011_000308_0001, Throughout the coves and valleys of the Great Smokies there are hundreds of primitive cabins of which this one is typical. The little building to the left is known as the "smokehouse". It is where the year's supply of pork is cured and stored.
View of Thunder Head from Gregory Bald
Document ID: 0012_001011_000309_0001

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