Images of East Tennessee

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East Tennessee Female Institute
The East Tennessee Female Institute was founded in 1828. The academy offered such courses as arithmetic, orthography, reading, music, penmanship, astronomy, chemistry, and latin. The institute was merged with the Knoxville public school system in 1882, and this building was demolished in 1889.
The Pickle Mansion
George Wesley Pickle built the Pickle Mansion (sometimes called Confederate Hall and Fort Sanders Hall) at 1633 Clinch Avenue in 1889. The structure was severely damaged by fire in 2003, but plans have been made to restore it. Pickle himself was a veteran of the Confederate Second Tennessee Infantry and served as Tennessee's Attorney General and Reporter of the State from 1886 to 1902.
Bradley Drug Co. and Co-Operative Drug Co. Inc.
The Bradley Drug Co. was founded in 1917 and had moved to its quarters at 624 S. Gay Street in downtown Knoxville by 1920. The Co-Operative Drug Co. Inc. replaced it in 1925, but went out of business in under a year.
Residence of Charles and Nellie Ross
This house, which stood on Rose Avenue in Knoxville, Tennessee, was home to Professor Charles C. Ross beginning in 1891. His sister Nellie lived with him from 1895 until she married James Milton Bailey in 1898. Another (currently unidentified) individual may also have occupied the house during this time. Charles Ross, Nellie Ross, and an illegible name are inscribed on the back of the picture.
The Empire Office Building
The Empire Building was constructed at the corner of Prince Street (now Market Street) and Church Street in 1901. Such diverse interests as labor unions, insurance agents, and lawyers rented space in this "fireproof" building.
Kuhlman's Drug Store No. 2
William D. Kuhlman opened the first of his chain of drugstores at 301 Gay Street in 1894. The store pictured, Kuhlman's Drug Store No. 2, opened at 600 S. Gay Street in 1905. It closed in 1909, but later re-opened at 607 S. Gay Street. Kuhlman eventually established three additional stores: one at 310 W. Clinch Avenue, one at 322 N. Gay Street, and one on S. Gay Street near the Tennessee River Bridge.
Graf-Cullum House
Richard F. Graf designed and built this house at 325 Woodlawn Pike in about 1923. The Graf family lived in this home for many years before Dr. J.P. Cullum acquired it. Graf and several of his sons operated the architecture firm R.F. Graf & Sons in downtown Knoxville from 1910 until 1942.
Central Methodist Episcopal Church, South
Central Methodist Episcopal Church South, designed by Chattanooga architect R.H. Hunt, was dedicated in March of 1927. It represented a combination of two older Knoxville Methodist congregations: Broad Street and Centenary. The church was renamed Central United Methodist Church when the United Methodist Church was formed in 1968. Although membership has dwindled, the church continues to operate today.
Kingston Apartments
The University of Tennessee built the 21-story Kingston Apartments in 1968 in order to accommodate its rapidly expanding student population. The building served as married and graduate student housing until 2006, when New York developer Stanley Mohr bought the property with plans to turn it into a private apartment building.
Elks Home
The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks Home was originally located at 421 W. Main Avenue. The Elks moved to the Home pictured here in 1909, when Colonel J.Y. Johnston took over the Main Avenue property to use as his private residence. This picture is a copy of a postcard that was mailed in 1909.
First Presbyterian Church
Although the congregation was established in the 1790s, the original First Presbyterian Church building (called the "Brick Meeting House" was not finished until 1816. This structure was replaced by the one shown here in 1855. This building was razed in 1901 in order to allow for the construction of a larger facility.
The Knoxville Sentinel Building
The Knoxville Sentinel was founded in 1886 and merged with the Knoxville News to form the Knoxville News-Sentinel in 1926. This image shows the Sentinel building in the early 1920s, including the electric streetcars that ran past it and one of the towers where policemen controlled traffic lights.

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