Images of East Tennessee

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Hugh James Agee House
Standing at 1505 Highland Avenue, this house belonged to Knoxville author James Rufus Agee's father, Hugh James Agee. This structure appears in Agee's autobiographical A Death in the Family (1957).
Christian Union Community Club
The Christian Union Community Club was formed in about 1918 and disbanded in 1929. The building shown was later used for other benevolent purposes, including a WPA night school and a Junior League Day Nursery.
Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA)
Knoxville's first YMCA was organized in 1854 at the Second Presbyterian Church. The organization moved to this structure, standing on the corner of Commerce and State, in 1900. They continued to meet here until 1929, when they moved to a newer edifice on the corner of Locust and Clinch.
Knoxville tenement
Tenement standing in what is now downtown Knoxville. The Andrew Johnson Hotel is visible in the left background.
Knoxville City Hall
View of the front entrance to Knoxville's old City Hall. The building was constructed in 1844 and originally housed the Tennessee School for the Deaf. It served as a makeshift hospital for both Union and Confederate troops during the Civil War but returned to its original purpose when the war ended. It became Knoxville's City Hall in 1924, and continued in this function until 1980. The structure is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Knoxville Civic Auditorium and Coliseum
The Knoxville Civic Auditorium and Coliseum opened in the fall of 1961. Built with musical performances in mind, it seats 2,500 people and offers a 57 foot by 54 foot stage. It has also hosted such non-musical entertainments as circuses and ice shows.
Perez Dickinson's Home
Perez Dickinson was born in Amherst, Massachusetts in 1813. He moved to Knoxville in about 1830, where he quickly became an extremely popular and successful merchant. He had this elegant home at the corner of Main and Locust Streets built in 1831. After his death in 1901, C.B. Atkin bought the house and made several additions, including a front portico in the classic colonial style. The structure was demolished in about 1950.
Colonel James Van Deventer's Home
Colonel James Van Deventer and his family lived in this home on Temple Avenue (now called Volunteer Boulevard) from approximately 1900 until 1908. The University of Tennessee later used the structure as its Faculty Club, and the building was finally razed in the 1980s to allow for the construction of Hodges Library.
Craighead-Jackson House
John Craighead constructed the Craighead-Jackson House in 1818. After Robert Craighead II sold the property in 1855, the structure passed through many hands and fell into serious disrepair. In the late 1950s, the Blount Mansion Association arranged for the home's restoration. The edifice opened as a museum on 3 April 1966 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. This museum also houses William Perry "Buck" Toms' collection of 18th century silver, said to be the finest in the Southeast.
Governor William Blount's Office
Both Governor Blount's home and office were built in 1792. Although the home was restored and opened as a museum in the early 1920s, the office was not repaired until 1955. It currently serves as part of the Blount Mansion museum.
Unidentified home in Knoxville
Unidentified home in what appears to be a middle-class section of Knoxville. Unfortunately, no identifying information about the house or the small boy on the path in the yard is available.
Swan's Bread Company
Brothers Charles and George Swan founded Swan Brothers Bakery in 1883. They were originally located on Central Street and operated a stall in Knoxville's Market House. The company acquired what became their main facility on the 1800 block of Magnolia Avenue (shown) in 1928, where they continued to operate until being acquired by the American Bread Company in 1989. The bakery finally closed in 1991 and the buildings were auctioned in 1992.

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