Images of East Tennessee

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University of Tennessee's Old College and West College
View of Old College and West College on the University of Tennessee's Hill. Old College was completed in 1828 and West College and East College were added later on. All three buildings were razed in 1919.
Tate Springs Hotel
Captain Thomas Tomlinson built the Tate Springs Hotel in the late 1800s near one of the mineral springs flowing from Clinch Mountain in Grainger County. The resort, which featured cottages, stables, a golf course, and a park, was extremely prosperous until the Great Depression. The original structure was torn down in 1936 and the property was sold to Kingswood School in 1941. Today, the only remnant of the hotel is a gazebo standing near the mineral spring.
Knoxville's Girls' High School
Knoxville's Girls' High School was established at the East Tennessee Female Institute in 1886. The building pictured became home to the school when the Institute was razed in 1889. When Knoxville High School opened in 1910, the Girls' High School became Boyd Junior High.
Knoxville Court House
The first Knox County Court House was designed by architect Drury P. Armstrong and constructed in 1842. It was replaced by a more modern building, built in the Queen Anne style, in 1885. Now called the old Knoxville Courthouse, this structure stands on approximately the site of the Federal barracks of James White's Fort. New wings were added to either side of the courthouse in 1919. Tennessee's first governor, John Sevier, and his wives, Sarah Hawkins and Catherine "Bonny Kate" Sherrill, are buried on the lawn.
Corner of Melrose Street and Cumberland Avenue
View of the intersection of Melrose Avenue and Cumberland Avenue, showing the entrance to a residential neighborhood and a set of electric streetcar tracks. Melrose Park was originally an upscale Knoxville residential neighborhood. The University of Tennessee acquired the area in the 1960s and began destroying its Victorian-era homes to allow for University expansion in the late 1970s. Although several homes were adapted to house University programs, few traces of the area's original character remain today.
Knox County Court House
The first Knox County Court House was designed by architect Drury P. Armstrong and constructed in 1842. It was replaced by a more modern building, built in the Queen Anne style, in 1885. Now called the old Knoxville Courthouse, this structure stands on approximately the site of the Federal barracks of James White's Fort. New wings were added to either side of the courthouse in 1919. Tennessee's first governor, John Sevier, and his wives, Sarah Hawkins and Catherine "Bonny Kate" Sherrill, are buried on the lawn.
Moore Oil Company
Calloway A. Moore (1881-1965) operated the Moore Oil Company on Knoxville's North Gay Street between 1923 and 1927. This image shows the store itself, the trolley tracks in front of the store, and banners advertising Marathon Motor Oil.
Oakwood Mansion
Charles J. McClung built Oakwood Mansion for his son, Matthew McClung, in 1870. The house changed hands in 1873, when it became home to Matthew's sister Lucy and her husband, Jacob Lytton Thomas. The home was then located at the outskirts of town, allowing Thomas to farm and raise livestock. Railroad contractor Henry H. Thrasher purchased the house in about 1905 and remodeled it completely, adding porches, columns, and the brick exterior. He sold it in the late 1920s to a group of physicians, who renamed it the Howard-Henderson Hospital. It was briefly known as the Acuff Clinic before becoming the Kingston Pike Motel in the late 1950s. When that enterprise failed, the structure was remodeled and reopened as the Kingston Pike Nursing Home. It continued in this capacity until the early 1990s. It was home to a number of businesses, including a beauty parlor and a restaurant, before Sam Furrow purchased it in 1999. The structure currently serves as office space for a number of enterprises.
Oakwood Mansion
Charles J. McClung built Oakwood Mansion for his son, Matthew McClung, in 1870. The house changed hands in 1873, when it became home to Matthew's sister Lucy and her husband, Jacob Lytton Thomas. The home was then located at the outskirts of town, allowing Thomas to farm and raise livestock. Railroad contractor Henry H. Thrasher purchased the house in about 1905 and remodeled it completely, adding porches, columns, and the brick exterior. He sold it in the late 1920s to a group of physicians, who renamed it the Howard-Henderson Hospital. It was briefly known as the Acuff Clinic before becoming the Kingston Pike Motel in the late 1950s. When that enterprise failed, the structure was remodeled and reopened as the Kingston Pike Nursing Home. It continued in this capacity until the early 1990s. It was home to a number of businesses, including a beauty parlor and a restaurant, before Sam Furrow purchased it in 1999. The structure currently serves as office space for a number of enterprises.
C.J. McClung Residence
Charles J. McClung, Franklin H. McClung, and James Cowan operated an extremely successful dry goods wholesale business called Cowan, McClung, and Co. in central Knoxville during the early part of the 20th century. Built in 1875, this home was designed by Nashville architect P.J. Williamson and stood on Main Avenue until it was destroyed in about 1964.
Wallace McClure Residence
Wallace K. McClure purchased this home on Temple Avenue (now Volunteer Boulevard) from Henry H. Ingersoll in 1902. He and his family lived in the house until his death in 1921. In 1941, Wallace McClure Jr. donated the house to the University of Tennessee as part of the W.K. McClure Foundation for the Study of World Affairs that he had founded as a memorial for his father. The house was demolished in the 1960s.
Chisholm's Tavern
John Chisholm built this structure, which he operated as Chisholm's Tavern, on land he bought from James White in 1792. He sold the property sometime before 1800. In this photograph, the building is shown in use as a multi-family residence. The edifice was razed in December of 1966.

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