Images of East Tennessee

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Goetz Sanitarium
Henry Edward Goetz, founder of the Goetz Sanitarium, was born to Edward and Sarah Jane (Hawn) Goetz on February 16, 1874 in Louisville, Tennessee. He attended the Bell House School and the University of Tennessee before graduating from the Tennessee Medical College in 1905. He married Beatrice Hollister on January 24, 1898, and the couple had at least three children%3A Royal Frank, Beatrice, and Helena. Goetz did postgraduate work in 1906 and eventually specialized in otolaryngology. He later became interested in narcotics addicts and attended a special course in mental and nervous diseases in New York in 1913. He founded the Goetz Sanitarium on North Broadway upon his return to Knoxville. He moved his hospital to the Fountain Head Hotel in 1917, and continued to work here until his death following the removal of a brain tumor on December 2, 1927.
Volunteer Portland Cement Company
View of the Volunteer Portland Cement Company in Knoxville, Tennessee.
M.B. Arnstein
View of the M.B. Arnstein & Co. Department Store on the corner of Market Street and Union Avenue in downtown Knoxville. Max B. Arnstein (1858-1961) opened the store in 1905, and it was considered one of the South's better stores until it closed in 1928. The TVA later used the building as office space.
Barracks for Federal troops
Painting of a barracks used by the Federal troops who came to Knoxville in 1793 to protect the settlers from Native American attack. The building was located near what is now the corner of Gay Street and Main Street.
Brownlow Building
View of the Brownlow Building, managed by the J.B. & W.G. Brownlow Co., in downtown Knoxville. John Bell Brownlow and his son William Gannaway Brownlow II started the firm in 1904, and it survived until John Brownlow's death in 1922.
Market Square Dry Goods Company
View of a building on Knoxville's Market Square housing the Market Square Dry Goods Company and the Endicott Johnson Shoe Store.
The Knoxville Sentinel Building
View of the Knoxville Sentinel building. The paper was founded in 1886 and merged with the Knoxville News in 1926. The paper's mottos, "A clean, constructive newspaper" and "When you see it in the Sentinel it's so" are visible on the building's front.
Hotel Atkin and Economy Drug Co.
Clay Brown Atkin (1864-1931) built the Hotel Atkin in the late 1870s on Knoxville's Gay Street. Atkin also ran a business manufacturing furniture and mantels, developed a number of other Knoxville and Fountain City properties, and served as director of a number of local organizations.
Van Deventer Building
This structure, which became the Van Deventer building in 1905, was built shortly after the catastrophic fire of 1897 and was advertised as one of Knoxville's fireproof buildings. It operated as the Van Deventer building until 1916, at which time it became the St. James Hotel.
Home at 1201 West Clinch Avenue
Three-story house at 1201 West Clinch Avenue.
Buck Karns Bridge
The Buck Karns bridge was named for Knoxville resident James (Buck) Karns, who was one of six Tennesseeans to earn the Congressional Medal of Honor during World War I. The bridge is part of US-129 and crosses the Tennessee River near the University of Tennessee's Agricultural Campus. It is also known as the Alcoa Highway Bridge.
House on Towanda Trail in Sequoyah Hills
Two-story house on Towanda Trail in Knoxville's Sequoyah Hills neighborhood showing front driveway and yard.

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