Images of East Tennessee

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Ellis and Ernest Drugstore
College friends Wilbur Ellis and Harold Ernest opened Ellis and Ernest Drugstore near the University of Tennessee campus in 1926. For many years, E&E served as a popular gathering place for UT students as well as Knoxville residents and tourists. The drugstore was razed in the late 1960s in order to accommodate the Carolyn P. Brown University Center, but the establishment was commemorated with the Ellis and Ernest Friendship Walk.
Earthworks at the Battle of Fort Sanders
View from the earthworks at Fort Sanders (looking south). Buildings shown include the Strong Mansion and Melrose Estate.
Samuel Cowan Estate
View of the Samuel Cowan Estate on Kingston Pike.
England Sound
View of stores on Cumberland Avenue including England Sound and Professional Sound Corporation.
J.E. Lutz Residence
John Edwin and Adelia (Armstrong) Lutz built this home, called "Westwood," on Knoxville's Kingston Pike in approximately 1890. J.E. Lutz was a successful merchant and insurance broker in Knoxville during the early 20th century. The home was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.
Jim Thompson Co. Photographic Studio
Jim Thompson's photographic studio, located at 615 Lowry in Knoxville, Tennessee. Thompson was one of East Tennessee's most prolific photographers during the early 20th century.
Henley Street Bridge
View of the Henley Street Bridge crossing the Tennessee River. The bridge was built in 1932 at a cost of $1,000,000.
William Blount Mansion
William Blount (who signed the US Constitution and served as the Governor of the Territory of the United States South of the Ohio River) and his wife Mary commissioned this home in 1792. In addition to its impressive size, the home boasted a number of features not commonly seen on the frontier, including hardwood floors and glass windows. A group of women led by Mary Boyce Temple led a campaign to preserve Blount Mansion in the early 1920s, and the house became a museum in 1925. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.
Knoxville General Hospital
Knoxville General Hospital opened on Cleveland Place in 1902. It served as Knoxville's primary hospital until August of 1956, when it was replaced by the University of Tennessee Memorial Hospital (now the University of Tennessee Medical Center).
Lawson McGhee Library
In 1885, Charles McClung McGhee established the Lawson McGhee Library as a memorial to his daughter, May Lawson McGhee Williams. The original building on the corner of Gay and Vine was replaced by this white marble structure on the corner of Market and Commerce in 1917. It remained in use until 1971, when a new building was constructed.
Woodside Building, Eastern State Hospital for the Insane
Knoxville's Eastern State Hospital for the Insane formally opened in 1886. Woodside, shown here, was added to the main complex in 1898.
Knoxville Academy of Medicine
Built in 1812, this structure originally served as prominent Knoxvillian James Parks' private residence. The Knoxville Academy of Medicine purchased the building in 1949 and added a large addition (not shown) in 1968. The building is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places and further restoration is planned.

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