Images of East Tennessee

Pages

Cherokee Country Club
View of the Cherokee Country Club's original clubhouse, constructed in 1908. The structure was demolished in 1928 to make way for a more elaborate clubhouse designed by Knoxville architects Baumann and Baumann.
The Pickle Mansion
George Wesley Pickle built the Pickle Mansion (sometimes called Confederate Hall and Fort Sanders Hall) at 1633 Clinch Avenue in 1889. The structure was severely damaged by fire in 2003, but plans have been made to restore it. Pickle himself was a veteran of the Confederate Second Tennessee Infantry and served as Tennessee's Attorney General and Reporter of the State from 1886 to 1902.
W.M. Fulton House
View of the W.M. Fulton house, built in 1928. According to Victor A. Hyde, this home is located in an A-type community: one "occupied by white inhabitants, having a value of $10,000 or more." Weston Miller Fulton himself (1871-1946) was exceptionally wealthy, having invented a number of useful (and profitable) gadgets.
1205 W. Clinch Avenue
View of single-family home located at 1205 W. Clinch Avenue in Knoxville, Tennessee. According to Victor A. Hyde, this residence is located in a B-type district, which he defines as one "occupied by white occupants, in which the residences range in value from $2,500 to $10,000." These communities generally separate wealthy A-type communities from poorer C-type communities.
Wonderland Hotel
The Wonderland Park resort community (including the Wonderland Hotel) was created in Elkmont in 1912 to rival the Appalachian Club's nearby resort area. The Wonderland Park Hotel and its associated buildings became the Wonderland Club in 1914 when they were sold to a group of private investors from Knoxville. Most of these private owners managed to obtain lifetime leases when the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was created. The majority of these leases were eventually converted to 20-year leases that were later extended to expire in 1992. The Wonderland Hotel ceased operations when its lease expired and collapsed in 2005 while debate over what to do with the historic structures standing in Elkmont raged. Although salvage efforts were discussed, the hotel was demolished in late 2006.
Edward Sanford Mansion (Maplehurst)
Businessman Edward Jackson Sanford and his wife, Emma Chavannes, bought this home from Knoxville businessman and politician James Hervey Cowan in 1890. Originally known as "River Lawn," the Sanfords renamed the property "Maplehurst" because of the several maple trees growing on the property. Sanford died in 1902, and in 1912 his estate sold the property to Alex McMillan & Co. for development.
Perez Dickinson Home
Perez Dickinson was born in Amherst, Massachusetts in 1813. He moved to Knoxville in about 1830, where he quickly became an extremely popular and successful merchant. He had this elegant home at the corner of Main and Locust Streets built in 1831. After his death in 1901, C.B. Atkin bought the house and made several additions, including a front portico in the classic colonial style. The structure was demolished in about 1950.
Jane Kennedy's Home
View of Mrs. Jane Kennedy's home. General James White built part of the house itself (the first in Knoxville) in 1786. It was originally located at one corner of a rectangular lot with smaller houses in the other three corners, a common frontier design intended to protect against Indians. After the White family established a farm away from this location, the structure was repurposed as the kitchen wing of the Kennedy residence on State Street. In 1906, Isaiah Ford purchased the building and moved it to Woodlawn Pike, where he used it as a private residence. It changed hands again in 1970, when the City Association of Women's Clubs purchased the home and moved it back to central Knoxville. It currently stands near the Knoxville Coliseum and is one of the most visited historical sites in the city.
Bijou Theater
The Lamar House Hotel was built in 1817. The Bijou Theatre opened as part of that hotel on March 8, 1909. Over the years, it hosted many famous vaudeville and theater acts. By 2005, however, the Theater was deteriorating and its owners defaulted on their mortgage. Knoxvillians, including Mayor Bill Haslam, banded together to save the Theater and fundraising and renovation efforts are ongoing.
Walkway to City-County Building
Walkway passing over a street and leading to Knoxville's City-County Building.
Gay Street
View looking North down Gay Street in downtown Knoxville.
Knoxville High School
Knoxville High School was built on the site of the old J.Y. Johnston home in 1910 and expanded in 1914 and 1920. It was intended to provide a cultural education and enjoyed a reputation as one of the South's best schools. The school's last class graduated in 1951, after which the structure served as the city schools administration's headquarters. The building was repurposed again in the 1980s, and now houses a number of educational programs including adult education, the adult high school, GED testing, and continuing education.

Pages