Images of East Tennessee

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McGhee Tyson Field
View of McGhee Tyson Field showing small planes, cars, and a hanger.
Second Presbyterian Church
The Second Presbyterian Church was organized in 1818 due to a split (brought on by disagreements over doctrine and renting pews) in the First Presbyterian Church's congregation. They built their first church on the west side of Prince (now Market) Street in 1820. The congregation grew quickly and moved to a larger building on the corner of Clinch Avenue and Market Street in 1860. The area around the church grew more congested as Knoxville grew, and the congregation sold their Market Street property and moved to a new building on the corner of Clinch and Walnut in 1905. The congregation eventually outgrew this building as well, and moved to a structure on Kingston Pike in 1957.
Hotel Farragut
Named after Admiral David Glasgow Farragut, the Hotel Farragut opened on the corner of Gay and Clinch (the site of the old Imperial Hotel) on February 1, 1919. It flourished until 1929 when the Andrew Johnson Hotel opened nearby, after which time the two hotels provided each other with stiff competition. The Farragut closed in 1977 and was converted into office space in 1978.
Hotel Imperial
The Imperial Hotel was built on the corner of Gay and Clinch Streets in about 1894. It replaced several older businesses, including the Hotel Hattie. The Imperial burned down in 1916 and was replaced by the "completely fireproof" Farragut Hotel in 1919.
Whittle Springs Hotel
The original Whittle Springs Hotel was built in about 1902 about three miles to the north of Knoxville. It advertised such conveniences as electric lights, baths, unexcelled cusine, and both telephone and telegraph connections. This structure burned in 1919, and the second Whittle Springs Hotel (shown) was constructed on the same site. This building was razed in 1964.
Vestal Lumber Company
View of the Vestal Lumber Company showing logs moving down the river and the sawmill.
Single-family home in central Knoxville
Side view of a single-family home in central Knoxville.
Mrs. Jane Kennedy's Home
Four children playing on the front lawn of Mrs. Jane Kennedy's home. General James White built part of the house itself (the first in Knoxville) in 1786. It was originally located at one corner of a rectangular lot with smaller houses in the other three corners, a common frontier design intended to proctect against Indians. After the White family established a farm away from this location, the structure was repurposed as the kitchen wing of the Kennedy residence on State Street. In 1906, Isaiah Ford purchased the building and moved it to Woodlawn Pike, where he used it as a private residence. It changed hands again in 1970, when the City Association of Women's Clubs purchased the home and moved it back to central Knoxville. It currently stands near the Knoxville Coliseum and is one of the most visited historical sites in the city.
Knoxville street corner
View of a street corner in central Knoxville showing several cars and a sign directing the traveller to the police station.
Thompson Brothers Commercial Photography Studio
View of the Thompson Brothers photography studio in Knoxville. The sign reads "Thompson Brothers Commercial Photographers." Marks on the building's facade show where and earlier sign (reading "The Thompson Co., Jim Thompson, Photographers") was removed.
Knoxville High School
Knoxville High School was built on the site of the old J.Y. Johnston home in 1910 and expanded in 1914 and 1920. It was intended to provide a cultural education and enjoyed a reputation as one of the South's best schools. The school's last class graduated in 1951, after which the structure served as the city schools administration's headquarters. The building was repurposed again in the 1980s, and now houses a number of educational programs including adult education, the adult high school, GED testing, and continuing education.
Tennessee State Capitol Building
In the early 20th century, popular theory held that this building, located on Cumberland Avenue, was the first state capitol of Tennessee. There is, however, no evidence to support this claim - indeed, several astute commentators have pointed out that this structure was not built until after the capital had moved to Middle Tennessee. In any case, the building was razed in January of 1927.

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